Byakuren (White Lotus) Judith Ragir

Judith sitting on dockIs it possible to find freedom and happiness?  Buddhism is, in this regard, radically optimistic.  Pessimism and optimism meet in the Four Noble Truths.  Pessimistically, samsara (the cyclic existence of ordinary reality) is always broken and we suffer. And yet, Buddha himself said, the chain of suffering can be broken by a change in our understanding of reality and the reorientation of our minds. We can find well-being.

Changing the basis of operation in our minds is a long task.  We have to be unflaggingly determined to pivot our minds day after day, moment after moment.  We have to use the three bases that Buddha gave us:  wisdom, concentration and ethical integrity.  Gradually and suddenly, we can transform our understanding and find freedom.

Freedom is not in another place or another time.  It is “just this”.  The miracle of life is everywhere.  It hits us in the nose, on our cheeks, and in our eyes.  We simply have to come back to Now.  We simply have to be devoted to kindness.

Recent Posts

Cause and Effect Arise Together #10

Dogen writes in “Going beyond Buddha”: We should know the ‘the matter of going beyond Buddha’ is neither being immersed in the cause nor in the ripening (attainment) of the fruit.  However, we can fully attain it and thoroughly penetrate ‘not-hearing’ at ‘the time of talking’. Our usual understanding is that ‘this causes that’.  Our … Continue reading Cause and Effect Arise Together #10

Clapping and Laughing #9

From Dogen’s “Going beyond Buddha”: “As for the expression “the matter of going beyond Buddha” of which I am speaking now, the great master Dongshan was the original ancestor who coined that phrase.  Other Buddha-ancestors have been studying the expression of this great matter and have attained the matter of going beyond buddha through the … Continue reading Clapping and Laughing #9