Entering Mindfulness of Feelings

Liberation through Feelings These are notes from Chapter 11 in Joseph Goldstein’s book Mindfulness. The purpose of these teaching is freeing the mind from suffering. It is about liberation not just: Getting more comfortable in our lives Or sorting out our personal histories These might be helpful But this exploration is about the larger questions … Continue reading Entering Mindfulness of Feelings

The Corpse in Decay

These are notes on the end of Chapter 10, mindfulness of physical characteristics, in Joseph Goldstein’s book Mindfulness. The last section of mindfulness of the body is the contemplation of corpses in various states of decay. Buddha’s contemplation in the sutta is: Again, monks, as though he were to see a corpse thrown aside in … Continue reading The Corpse in Decay

Mindfulness of “I am”

Continuing to study Mindfulness by Joseph Goldstein.   These are notes on the middle part of Chapter 10, “Mindfulness of physical characteristics” “Conceit” in its Buddhist usage, refers to the deeply rooted sense of “I am”, “I was”, or “I will be.” This is the last of the veils of ignorance that needs to be removed … Continue reading Mindfulness of “I am”

Mindfulness of the elements

These are notes from Joseph Goldstein’s book Mindfulness, the second half of Chapter 9, Mindfulness of activities. The elements Again, monks, one reviews this same body, however it is placed, however disposed, as consisting of elements thus: ‘in this body there are the earth element, the water element, the fire element, and the air element.’ … Continue reading Mindfulness of the elements

Mindfulness of Activities

This is a continuation of notes from Joseph Goldstein’s book Mindfulness, Chapter 9: Mindfulness of activities: Again, monks, when going forward and returning one acts clearly knowing; when looking ahead and looking away one acts clearly knowing; when flexing and extending one’s limbs one acts clearly knowing . . . when eating, drinking, consuming food, … Continue reading Mindfulness of Activities

Mindfulness of body postures #2 – selflessness

Continuing the study and notes from Joseph Goldstein’s book Mindfulness, Chapter 8, the second half. Mindfulness of postures can support the understanding of the three characteristics. Impermanence, anicca Dukkha, suffering Selflessness, anatta Under selflessness Who is walking?  Who is lying down? We can begin to explore the impersonal nature of existence An important stage of … Continue reading Mindfulness of body postures #2 – selflessness

Mindfulness of Breathing #2

These are my notes from studying the end of Chapter 7 in Joseph Goldstein’s book “Mindfulness.” They are the second half of Mindfulness of Breathing. In the Satipatthana sutta, there is a series of progressive instructions regarding the breath, which is the first of the contemplations on the body. Why mindfulness of breathing is so … Continue reading Mindfulness of Breathing #2

Satipatthanas sutta refrain

These are notes from Joseph Goldstein’s book “Mindfulness.” These notes are from Chapter 5 on Contemplating the Four Foundations. There is a refrain that occurs 13 times in the sutra. An abbreviated version is thus: In this way, in regard to the body (feelings, mind, dhammas) one abides contemplating the body (feelings, mind, dhammas) internally, or … Continue reading Satipatthanas sutta refrain

Mindfulness, the Gateway to Wisdom

Continuing with notes from Joseph Goldstein’s “Mindfulness” book. We are working with the section on the four qualities of mind: Ardency, Clearly knowing, mindfulness, and concentration. Mindfulness is much more than what our pop-culture thinks of it, which is simply something about returning to the present moment. The media often says- this was a Zen … Continue reading Mindfulness, the Gateway to Wisdom

Clearly knowing

Notes from Joseph Goldstein’s book “Mindfulness; a practical guide to awakening” Clearly knowing is one of the four qualities of mind: Ardency, Clearly knowing, mindfulness, and concentration. Clearly knowing – Sampajanna This is translated in different ways as clearly knowing, clear comprehension or fully aware. This is a quality of mind that encourages mindfulness to … Continue reading Clearly knowing